Again, that may sound crazy. But the idea is to address the lack of aggregate demand in the economy in the simplest, most mechanical fashion: if the economy needs more aggregate demand, you give people money to spend, since when people (especially non-rich ones) have more money, they spend more money, and therefore aggregate demand increases. People who don’t spend the money outright might choose instead to pay down debt, leaving them more willing to use credit for future spending, and people who worry that the policy will create inflation will move their money from cash and savings to spending on durable goods. (And, remember, the policy won’t create excessive inflation so long as there is slack in aggregate demand.) Federal Grant Eligibility
Wish you could make money just by using and checking your phone? This just might be one of the easiest free money apps to use. Slidejoy basically lets you rent out your Android lock screen for cash and gift cards. Here’s how it works: each time you check your phone, you’ll be shown an ad or news story. Then simply swipe left to learn more, slide up to see another promo, or slide right to get to your home screen. CNET says they’ll give you up to $15, which you can redeem on Paypal or donate to one of three charities, which include The Jericho Project, Got Your 6, and Tutor Chat Live. Federal Grant Acronyms
The third policy option is known as nominal gross domestic product targeting, the major proponent of which is the economist Scott Sumner. The idea is all about self-fulfilling expectations. Recall that the central bank owns the printing press, so it can create arbitrary quantities of dollars. By making a pre-commitment to keep the economy on a particular spending trajectory, self-fulfilling collapses in spending would not happen. Something similar to this policy seems to have kept Australia and Israel out of the Great Recession. But in order to sustain such a policy, the Fed might have to intervene in the economy quite frequently, and then the distributional consequences could be serious. Quantitative easing, for example, helps push up asset prices (the stock market has regained all the ground lost since 2009 and then some), which disproportionately benefits the wealthy. Free Money Machine
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