The Teacher Education Assistance for College and Higher Education (TEACH) Grant Program was created in 2007 through the College Cost Reduction and Access Act to provide financial assistance for teachers of high-demand fields who work in low-income schools. Eligible students can receive up to $4,000 per year. Low-income elementary and secondary schools are designated by the Department of Education. High-demand fields of study include foreign language, special education, math and science. If a student receives the TEACH grant and does not teach, the grant becomes a Federal Direct Unsubsidized Loan.
There’s lots more you’ll need to learn, and there are many other ways you can begin preparing your nonprofit to get federal funding to support its work in the community. One of the best ways you can learn what you need to know is by attending The Grantsmanship Center’s federal grants training, Competing for Federal Grants. This government grants training workshop is thorough and by participating fully in this federal grants class, you'll boost your competitive edge and be better prepared to find federal funding for your nonprofit. Free Money Management Apps
If you have a stroller or other baby gear lying around your house that you’re not currently using, you could rent it out for a profit with goBaby. The website and app connects traveling parents to local parents who are willing to rent out baby supplies including strollers, car seats, cribs, high chairs, bath and potty items, toys and books, and outdoor baby gear. According to the site, you can earn up to $600 a month renting out your baby supplies. Federal Grant Oversight
Why? Because the economy has evolved to a point where it is vulnerable to mild depressions. In fact, the one we’re in now could persist for decades, as similar conditions have in Japan and other countries. In order to avoid that slow, painful outcome, we need a policy that will jump-start our economy. After three straight years of political gridlock it’s clear that Congress is not going to provide the fiscal stimulus we need, and while the tools the Federal Reserve has at its disposal have helped, they’ve not done enough. If Congress could be persuaded to give the Fed a new tool, one that would let it distribute purchasing power to the broad mass of the population—to “drop money from helicopters,” so to speak—it might be enough to help us escape the nightmare of slow growth and persistent unemployment we’re in now. Federal Grant Recipient Database
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