In the sometimes-unsure footing of the federal grants world, our attorneys also work with clients to create the solutions that are right for their programs – from negotiation and drafting sub-recipient and contractor agreements to facilitating affiliations, collaborations, and partnerships between grantees and other parties. And while such action may be a last resort, our Federal Grants group has assisted many clients in responding to audit findings, government inquiries, cost disallowances, and more, and our attorneys have represented clients in negotiations and litigation at all judicial levels. Free Money Quiz
Phone numbers can deceive. Some con artists use Internet technology to disguise their area code in caller ID systems. Although it may look like they’re calling from Washington, DC, they could be calling from anywhere in the world. You can't rely on caller ID because scammers know how to rig it to show you the wrong information (aka "spoofing"). Scammers might have personal information about you before they call, so don't take that as a sign they're the real thing. If you're not sure whether you're dealing with the government, look up the official number of the agency.
Grants are EERE's primary funding vehicle for businesses, industries, universities and others. Most EERE grants are awarded on merit on a competitive basis. See also EERE Financial Opportunities and listings on Grants.gov or FedConnect. For state-by-state information on state, local. utility, and federal incentives that promote renewable energy and energy efficiency, search DSIRE (Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency).  Federal Energy Grant
Krugman is right that helicopter money isn’t fundamentally innovative economically. The argument here, however, is not economic; it’s institutional. Instead of Congress being in charge of distributing resources according to its erratic whims and halting ability to compromise, the Fed would do it. The Fed would watch aggregate demand closely (indeed, it already does this) and make quick, proactive decisions on whether to send everyone money, and how much, without having to wait for Congress to deliberate over a stimulus bill.
What’s more, there is no reason to think that our aggregate demand problem will be cured without some kind of aggressive change. The economist Brad DeLong has calculated that reasonable estimates of the current and future damage to our economy from the present crisis are greater than those from the Great Depression. “Unless something—and it will need to be something major—returns the U.S. to its pre-2008 growth trajectory, future economic historians will not regard the Great Depression as the worst business-cycle disaster of the industrial age,” he wrote in the journal Project Syndicate. “It is we who are living in their worst case.” Already our current weak economic expansion is near the length of the postwar average, and a new recession may strike at any time, which would erase the pitiful gains of the past five years. (God only knows what is cooking in the dungeons of Wall Street.) If we change nothing, we could be stuck in our current situation for decades. Japan has been mired in a similar trap for almost thirty years. Free Money In Minutes
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