The Iraq and Afghanistan Service Grant (IASG) is a federal grant for students whose parent or guardian was member of the U.S. armed forces and died in service in Iraq or Afghanistan after 9/11. This is not a need-based grant. Students’ who qualify for the Pell Grant based on Expected Family Income are not eligible for this award. Students are allowed to meet other Pell requirements, other than eligibility based on EFC. Students also had to be less than 24 years old or enrolled at least part-time in higher education at the time of the parent/guardian’s death. The current annual award grants up to $5,311.71 for qualifying individuals. Free Money Spells That Work Overnight
You will need thorough documentation of the problem your organization will address. No matter what you need the funding to accomplish—funding to help children succeed, funding to help the homeless, funding to help build healthy communities, funding for the arts, etc.—you’ll need lots of facts and figures that show what the situation you are concerned about looks like in your service area, why it is significant, and why it is happening. Start gathering data now and keep it current. Federal Pre-K Grant
Krugman is right that helicopter money isn’t fundamentally innovative economically. The argument here, however, is not economic; it’s institutional. Instead of Congress being in charge of distributing resources according to its erratic whims and halting ability to compromise, the Fed would do it. The Fed would watch aggregate demand closely (indeed, it already does this) and make quick, proactive decisions on whether to send everyone money, and how much, without having to wait for Congress to deliberate over a stimulus bill. Federal Grant Travel Policy
Why? Because the economy has evolved to a point where it is vulnerable to mild depressions. In fact, the one we’re in now could persist for decades, as similar conditions have in Japan and other countries. In order to avoid that slow, painful outcome, we need a policy that will jump-start our economy. After three straight years of political gridlock it’s clear that Congress is not going to provide the fiscal stimulus we need, and while the tools the Federal Reserve has at its disposal have helped, they’ve not done enough. If Congress could be persuaded to give the Fed a new tool, one that would let it distribute purchasing power to the broad mass of the population—to “drop money from helicopters,” so to speak—it might be enough to help us escape the nightmare of slow growth and persistent unemployment we’re in now. Federal Grant Recipient Database
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