Why hasn’t the helicopter money option already been enacted? The main reason is simply that until very recently we thought we had cured chronic shortages of aggregate demand, so no one was really thinking about these issues. The other reason is that Congress has not yet gotten it together to pass a law allowing the Fed to cut checks to the American people.
You’ll have to propose specific, measurable, results that you plan to achieve. Vague promises are not enough and will significantly dull your competitive edge. Stating that your organization’s project will “help children succeed,” “improve the quality of life,” “reduce hunger,” or “improve reading skills,” is not good enough. To get a big federal grant you’ll have to go much farther. Federal agencies want to know how many people will change, in what way, to what degree, within what time frame, and as measured by what? Start considering what changes you can realistically expect to achieve through your organization’s work. Federal Grant Graduate School
An accomplished student and athlete at George Mason University was not accepted to any sororities at the university. Her sister Lillie believes this is because she has Down syndrome. "Accepting a woman with a disability to a chapter isn't an act of charity, it brings diversity and promotes inclusion," Lillie Heigl wrote in her letter to the head of the university's Greek life. [...] Federal Grant Procurement Rules
The third policy option is known as nominal gross domestic product targeting, the major proponent of which is the economist Scott Sumner. The idea is all about self-fulfilling expectations. Recall that the central bank owns the printing press, so it can create arbitrary quantities of dollars. By making a pre-commitment to keep the economy on a particular spending trajectory, self-fulfilling collapses in spending would not happen. Something similar to this policy seems to have kept Australia and Israel out of the Great Recession. But in order to sustain such a policy, the Fed might have to intervene in the economy quite frequently, and then the distributional consequences could be serious. Quantitative easing, for example, helps push up asset prices (the stock market has regained all the ground lost since 2009 and then some), which disproportionately benefits the wealthy. Free Money Machine
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