With interest rates so low, banks are competing with one another for customers using a new technique: upfront cash payments. One of the best opportunities right now comes courtesy of Chase Bank. As of Aug. 1, 2018, customers can earn $200 when they open a new checking account online and another $150 for a new savings account with qualifying activities. Few things are better than getting paid to sign up for a service that most people need anyway. Federal Grant Research
The Federal Pell Grant Program provides need-based grants to low-income undergraduate and certain postbaccalaureate students to promote access to postsecondary education. Students may use their grants at any one of approximately 5,400 participating postsecondary institutions. Grant amounts are dependent on: the student's expected family contribution (EFC) (see below); the cost of attendance (as determined by the institution); the student's enrollment status (full-time or part-time); and whether the student attends for a full academic year or less.
The availability of funding in any year depends on the federal budget and on the priorities of the federal agencies that run the grant competitions. Because of that, the amount of money available for federal grants to nonprofits is heavily influenced by the political environment, national concerns, and national events. Tuning in to the national scene will help your nonprofit understand where federal grant money comes from and where it will go. This knowledge will help you get government funding for your community. Federal Grant Guidelines
Our attorneys are well versed in the problems that can arise when federal requirements meet real-world situations. We help clients through pre- and post-award matters, such as financial and program requirements, procurements, property issues, termination and enforcement, as well as how best to prepare for and respond to government reviews, audits, and cost disallowances. Free Money Kick The Buddy
In order to do that, economists have relied for the past seventy years or so on two basic tools: fiscal policy and monetary policy. The first concerns how the government taxes and spends; the second concerns the action of the central bank (in America, that’s the Federal Reserve), which controls the supply of money. While both tools are complex, the main thing to understand is that they both have an accelerator and a brake pedal. If the economy is overheating, with spending overtaking new production of goods and services, resulting in a bidding spiral and increasing inflation, we can hit the brakes. If the economy is moving too slowly, with spending not keeping pace with the production of goods and services, we can hit the gas. Free Money Today
The third policy option is known as nominal gross domestic product targeting, the major proponent of which is the economist Scott Sumner. The idea is all about self-fulfilling expectations. Recall that the central bank owns the printing press, so it can create arbitrary quantities of dollars. By making a pre-commitment to keep the economy on a particular spending trajectory, self-fulfilling collapses in spending would not happen. Something similar to this policy seems to have kept Australia and Israel out of the Great Recession. But in order to sustain such a policy, the Fed might have to intervene in the economy quite frequently, and then the distributional consequences could be serious. Quantitative easing, for example, helps push up asset prices (the stock market has regained all the ground lost since 2009 and then some), which disproportionately benefits the wealthy. Free Money Machine
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